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New chapter in Democrat problem over Obama vs Clinton stalemate: Part 1

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The campaign  for the Democratic nomination is getting uglier and uglier, thanks, in large part, to a strange superdelegate system and a stubborn Clinton campaign determined to capture the nomination by all means necessary, despite what the popular vote says. Recent reports show that Clinton is behind Obama in the popular vote by approximately 700,000 votes! — The last time I checked, political leadership was determined by the popular vote, not claims to elected office as if it were an entitlement. Clinton’s ambition and feelings of entitlement betray the people’s voice and the public interest.

Clinton backers scold Pelosi on superdelegate comment

Source: CNN Political Ticker http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2008/03/26/clinton-backers-scold-pelosi-on-superdelegate-comment/

Posted: 04:44 PM ET

Nearly 20 high-profile Hillary Clinton backers strongly criticized Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday over her recent suggestion that Democratic party superdelegates should not overturn the pledged delegate outcome at the party’s convention this August.

In a letter to the House Speaker dated Wednesday, the backers said that position is at odds with the party’s original intent on what the role of superdelegates should be.“Superdelegates, like all delegates, have an obligation to make an informed, individual decision about whom to support and who would be the party’s strongest nominee,” the backers wrote.

“Both campaigns agree that at the end of the primary contests neither will have enough pledged delegates to secure the nomination,” they also said. “In that situation, super-delegates must look to not one criterion but to the full panoply of factors that will help them assess who will be the party’s strongest nominee in the general election.”

In an ABC interview earlier this month, Pelosi said it was her belief whichever candidate ended the round a primaries with the pledged-delegate lead should be awarded the Democratic nomination by the superdelegates. That argument would benefit Barack Obama, whose current pledged delegate lead of 171 is virtually insurmountable given the party’s proportional delegation allocations, even if Clinton were to win each of the remaining 10 primary contests.

“If the votes of the superdelegates overturn what happened in the elections it would be harmful to the Democratic Party,” Pelosi said.

In their letter to Pelosi, the backers urged the House speaker to “clarify your position on super-delegates and reflect in your comments a more open view to the optional independent actions of each of the delegates at the National Convention in August.”

The letter comes one day after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid seemed to suggest Democratic leaders were in the process of working out a deal to ensure the party’s nomination fight does not go all the way to the convention.

“Things are being done,” Reid told the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

– CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney

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Author: rbvergara

Born and raised in the Philippines. Moved to California on April 15, 1986 two months after Marcos was overthrown. Have been building a new life and stronger roots in Southern California since then.

2 thoughts on “New chapter in Democrat problem over Obama vs Clinton stalemate: Part 1

  1. With all her exposed lies of late, I can’t see how the stalemate will last much longer.

  2. 22coffees you’re most likely right. Here’s an opinion from one of The NY Times’ and NPR’s more trusted pundits (often for the political Right, but sometimes for the Middle), David Brooks, that shares your sentiment. According to him, Clinton is only looking at a 5% chance of winning. And that to put the party through hell for 5% is as unreasonable as Huckabee carrying on with his candidacy when everything was already lined up for McCain. And I hope that analogy is not only appropriate, in this case, but also, and more importantly, prophetic.

    The Long Defeat

    By DAVID BROOKS
    Published: March 25, 2008

    Source: The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/25/opinion/25brooks.html?em&ex=1206590400&en=6b390342506e7ca3&ei=5087

    Hillary Clinton may not realize it yet, but she’s just endured one of the worst weeks of her campaign.

    First, Barack Obama weathered the Rev. Jeremiah Wright affair without serious damage to his nomination prospects. Obama still holds a tiny lead among Democrats nationally in the Gallup tracking poll, just as he did before this whole affair blew up.

    Second, Obama’s lawyers successfully prevented re-votes in Florida and Michigan. That means it would be virtually impossible for Clinton to take a lead in either elected delegates or total primary votes.

    Third, as Noam Scheiber of The New Republic has reported, most superdelegates have accepted Nancy Pelosi’s judgment that the winner of the elected delegates should get the nomination. Instead of lining up behind Clinton, they’re drifting away. Her lead among them has shrunk by about 60 in the past month, according to Avi Zenilman of Politico.com.

    In short, Hillary Clinton’s presidential prospects continue to dim. The door is closing. Night is coming. The end, however, is not near.

    Last week, an important Clinton adviser told Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen (also of Politico) that Clinton had no more than a 10 percent chance of getting the nomination. Now, she’s probably down to a 5 percent chance.

    Five percent.

    Let’s take a look at what she’s going to put her party through for the sake of that 5 percent chance: The Democratic Party is probably going to have to endure another three months of daily sniping. For another three months, we’ll have the Carvilles likening the Obamaites to Judas and former generals accusing Clintonites of McCarthyism. For three months, we’ll have the daily round of résumé padding and sulfurous conference calls. We’ll have campaign aides blurting “blue dress” and only-because-he’s-black references as they let slip their private contempt.

    For three more months (maybe more!) the campaign will proceed along in its Verdun-like pattern. There will be a steady rifle fire of character assassination from the underlings, interrupted by the occasional firestorm of artillery when the contest touches upon race, gender or patriotism. The policy debates between the two have been long exhausted, so the only way to get the public really engaged is by poking some raw national wound.

    For the sake of that 5 percent, this will be the sourest spring. About a fifth of Clinton and Obama supporters now say they wouldn’t vote for the other candidate in the general election. Meanwhile, on the other side, voters get an unobstructed view of the Republican nominee. John McCain’s approval ratings have soared 11 points. He is now viewed positively by 67 percent of Americans. A month ago, McCain was losing to Obama among independents by double digits in a general election matchup. Now McCain has a lead among this group.

    For three more months, Clinton is likely to hurt Obama even more against McCain, without hurting him against herself. And all this is happening so she can preserve that 5 percent chance.

    When you step back and think about it, she is amazing. She possesses the audacity of hopelessness.

    Why does she go on like this? Does Clinton privately believe that Obama is so incompetent that only she can deliver the policies they both support? Is she simply selfish, and willing to put her party through agony for the sake of her slender chance? Are leading Democrats so narcissistic that they would create bitter stagnation even if they were granted one-party rule?

    The better answer is that Clinton’s long rear-guard action is the logical extension of her relentlessly political life.

    For nearly 20 years, she has been encased in the apparatus of political celebrity. Look at her schedule as first lady and ever since. Think of the thousands of staged events, the tens of thousands of times she has pretended to be delighted to see someone she doesn’t know, the hundreds of thousands times she has recited empty clichés and exhortatory banalities, the millions of photos she has posed for in which she is supposed to appear empathetic or tough, the billions of politically opportune half-truths that have bounced around her head.

    No wonder the Clinton campaign feels impersonal. It’s like a machine for the production of politics. It plows ahead from event to event following its own iron logic. The only question is whether Clinton herself can step outside the apparatus long enough to turn it off and withdraw voluntarily or whether she will force the rest of her party to intervene and jam the gears.

    If she does the former, she would surprise everybody with a display of self-sacrifice. Her campaign would cruise along at a lower register until North Carolina, then use that as an occasion to withdraw. If she does not, she would soldier on doggedly, taking down as many allies as necessary.

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